AAMC Section bank: P/S questions.

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lotus0618
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2019 5:47 pm

AAMC Section bank: P/S questions.

Post by lotus0618 » Wed Mar 11, 2020 3:54 pm

-question 62: got this answer right but I want to make sure my rationale and testing strategy are correct here. I narrowed down to B and D. The reason why D is a better answer than B because it’s more direct compared to B; ‘automatic’ refers to an ‘increase in heart rate’ which is better than ‘displaying a frown’. Yeah?

-question 78: I initially picked D because I wanted to choose an answer that aligns with the behavior aspect suggested by the SG hypothesis. Understanding the unique stress cycle of individual can help the therapist to figure out his behaviors. Obviously, the correct answer is B-preventing depressive episodes.
My analysis to this question is that it’s like a CARS question. I guess my answer could be correct but there’s too much speculation and assumptions associated with it. I then picked A while reviewing it, but then A is not correct either because the passage doesn’t mention about the severity of symptoms. Only B is correct because it contains the evidence-“episodes” mentioned in the passage.
What can I do to avoid this kind of error in the future? I think the biggest issue for me is to pick the most direct answer that contains clues from the passage, without further assumptions/loops of logics.

-Does Alzheimer's disease affect all types of memory (explicit, implicit, and sensory memories)?

-question 80: honestly I have no idea how to approach this?
After reading the answer, it makes sense that we cannot just process novel info without being conscious. But also, why isn’t C correct? I mean we cannot VISUALLY process the frequency of specific events.

-question 94: I immediately crossed out A because nothing int he passage indicates about social norms, or anything that can infer to formal/informal sanctions. D and C are definitely wrong, leaving me choice B as the answer. I was certain that B could be correct because getting rewards as the motivation to achieve goals is a latent function.

-question 99: I got this right, but still don’t truly understand the difference b/t intragenerational vs vertical mobility?

thank you so much!
NS_Tutor_Mathias
Posts: 543
Joined: Sat Mar 30, 2019 8:39 pm

Re: AAMC Section bank: P/S questions.

Post by NS_Tutor_Mathias » Thu Mar 12, 2020 4:41 pm

#62:
Activation of the amygdala would increase heartrate (an automatic response), rather than display a frown (a voluntary response). Some people MAY display a frown in this time period, but there is nothing to suggest that is the case. We do know their heart rates must be increasing though, however transiently.

#78:
This is indeed a bit of a jerk of a question.

There are two big giveaways:
1. The passage itself mentions 'long-term exposure to stressful events' and the vastly increased risk for depression for people with prior episodes of depression (it does NOT explicitly say that this is part of the SG hypothesis, but we can later figure out that it fits precisely with the SG hypothesis as described)

2. Understanding of unique stresses isn't actually part of SG hypothesis - it does NOT say that unique stresses matter at all, just stress in general. The type of stress may not matter.

#Alzheimers:
Implicit memory is often spared, but I don't think this sort of distinction is MCAT relevant.

#80:
You are confusing being conscious with making a conscious effort.

For example, you are reading this sentence virtually without a conscious effort. But to understand it, or to understand novel information, you have to slow down and exert conscious effort. You don't make a conscious effort to for example grab a glass, hold a pencil, or most importantly, on whether or not to process the myriad sensory stimuli you experience every instant. However, to decide what to pour into the glass, or what kind of writing utensil to buy, or what sentence to write, a conscious effort is necessary.

That is the difference between an automatic process and a voluntary one.

Same way that you can for instance drive without explicitly thinking to yourself what you're doing, or stand, or simply look at a tree. These things require little to no conscious effort (but obviously you are conscious at the time). Assimilating novel information always requires a conscious effort (at least as far as the MCAT is concerned).

#94:
That is the danger with hunting for key words rather than imagining the concept being described and what it is analogous to. In this case both the formal and informal sanctions result in positive outcomes, but it is in both cases social sanctioning at work. Here is a pretty brief summary on social sanctions and social control:
http://www.yourarticlelibrary.com/socio ... or%20group.

(And if you start wondering "Hey, isn't that a major way that I am being controlled?" then you are getting it. Psychology looks for a lot of broad concepts that can describe a majority of human behavior, in an effort to emulate the more traditional fields of science. Sometimes this yields useful models, sometimes it is a little more fraught.)

#99:
You would be correct to say this is also intragenerational mobility. This is just a case of 'better answer'.
lotus0618
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2019 5:47 pm

Re: AAMC Section bank: P/S questions.

Post by lotus0618 » Sun Mar 15, 2020 2:33 pm

80. I understand why D is correct now. But I still don't understand why without conscious effort, we COULD process the frequency of specific events. Unless we pay attention and put an effort into counting the frequency of events, how are we supposed to know how many times this event has happened?
I'm also stuck with the word 'visually' here, what's the significance of having this word in this question and how does this help me choose the correct answer?

94. The article makes it super clear to me. It turns out the reason I got this question wrong because I don't truly understand the full meaning of sanctions. I didn't know this concept also refers to positive sanctions.
Can you please elaborate on what you meant by "hunting for key words rather than imagining the concept being described and what it is analogous to"?

99. Can you please give me specific examples that can be either vertical mobility or intragenerational mobility?
lotus0618
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2019 5:47 pm

Re: AAMC Section bank: P/S questions.

Post by lotus0618 » Thu Mar 19, 2020 3:28 pm

knock knock
NS_Tutor_Mathias
Posts: 543
Joined: Sat Mar 30, 2019 8:39 pm

Re: AAMC Section bank: P/S questions.

Post by NS_Tutor_Mathias » Sat Mar 21, 2020 11:39 pm

#80:
Frequency of event information is actually intrinsic to a lot of things you process, when you for instance pick up on the frequency of a beat. This requires no conscious processing, you know whether something is happening once, in rapid succession or slowly. The word 'visually' in the question stem comes from the AAMC taking a pretty specific stance on parallel processing for visual events, while I haven't heard any such strict definitions for touch for instance.

Essentially, just be familiar with parallel processing of visual information.

#94:
Hunting for keywords means you may be looking for similar phrasing, rather than vastly different phrasing but a highly similar meaning. That is, an operant conditioning question may not use the word 'reward' or 'reinforcement', and a question about stratification may use no example of stratification you are familiar with. Groupthink or hierarchies may be applied to areas you don't normally consider them as part of. Basically, concepts may be generalized to test your understanding and ability to recognize a concept in an entirely new context.

#99:
Vertical mobility can be intra- or intergenerational. Sorry, that wasn't a terribly clear reply initially.
As an example:
A person may do a poor job leading one company, then get asked to lead a bigger company later on due to prior leadership experience. This is vertical mobility (and intragenerational).
Another person may have doctors and lawyers for parents, but become a schoolteacher themselves. This is also vertical mobility, but intergenerational.

A worthwhile note is that the AAMC defines the vertical position of your profession or station in life almost solely based on income. Keep that in mind.
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